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Women's Basketball Coaching Staff
Lisa Stone
Head Coach
Coach Info:
Position: Head Coach
Alma Mater: University of Iowa
Graduating Year: 1984
Experience: 4 Years
Follow Coach Stone on Twitter at @CoachStone_SLU.

•Formally introduced as Saint Louis’ seventh head women’s basketball coach on May 4, 2012.

•Began the 2016-17 season (her 31st as a head coach) with a 568-298 record, including a 65-61 mark in her first four campaigns at SLU.

•Career record also includes eight seasons at Wisconsin (128-119), three seasons at Drake (64-27), 12 seasons at Wisconsin-Eau Claire (277-59) and three seasons at Cornell (Iowa) (34-32).

•Named A-10 Coach of the Year and College Sports Madness High Major National Coach of the Year in 2016. Has earned eight conference Coach of the Year awards during her career.

•Nineteen of her teams have competed in postseason play (14 NCAA tournaments, five WNIT appearances). Guided the 1996-97 and 1993-94 Wisconsin-Eau Claire teams to second place and third place, respectively, in the NCAA Division III Championship. Led Drake to the NCAA round of 16 in 2001-02 and Wisconsin to a WNIT runner-up finish in 2006-07.


Lisa Stone arrived at Saint Louis University in May 2012 with a vision to build Billiken women’s basketball into a championship-caliber program.

Four years later, her vision came into clear focus.

The 2015-16 Billikens enjoyed a breakthrough season in Stone’s fourth year at the helm. Saint Louis tied for the Atlantic 10 Conference regular-season championship – the first league title in team history – reached the A-10 Championship semifinals for the first time, and advanced to the third round of the Women’s National Invitation Tournament as the A-10’s automatic qualifier.

The Billikens (26-8, 13-3 A-10) set program records for total victories, conference victories, overall winning percentage, conference winning percentage, conference winning streak, home wins and road wins, and they tied the team record for best start to a season. One of SLU’s 26 wins was an 84-81 triumph over No. 23 Duquesne, giving the Billikens a victory over a nationally ranked opponent for a second straight season.

Stone completed the 2015-16 season, her 30th as a collegiate head coach, with a 568-298 career record and a 65-61 mark at SLU. She was rewarded for the Billikens’ success by being named A-10 Coach of the Year and College Sports Madness High Major National Coach of the Year, becoming the first Saint Louis women’s basketball coach to earn Coach of the Year plaudits.

Sophomore point guard Jackie Kemph became the first Billiken women’s basketball player to earn All-America recognition (Associated Press honorable mention). Kemph also was selected A-10 co-Player of the Year and garnered a first-team nod on the College Sports Madness All-High Major Team. Junior center Sadie Stipanovich and senior guard Jamesia Price landed on the All-Conference third team and the A-10 All-Defensive team, respectively, for a second consecutive year.

Saint Louis’ success in 2015-16 had its foundation in all facets of the game. The Billikens averaged 70.3 points – the first time in nine seasons SLU has topped the 70-point mark – set school marks for 3-point field goals (205) and assists (573) for a second consecutive year, and shot a school-record 76.3 percent from the free throw line. Saint Louis allowed 61.3 points per game, almost four fewer than the previous season, and collected a school-record 1,304 rebounds. The Billikens finished among the top 30 teams in the nation in assists, assist-turnover ratio, free throw percentage, free throws made and 3-point field goal percentage defense.

Winning close games also was a hallmark of last year’s team. The Bills were 7-2 in contests decided by six or fewer points, including victories of one point and four points in the WNIT.

Stone coaches a group of young women who also are accomplished students. The Billikens have placed among the top 15 on the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association’s Academic Top 25 Team Honor Roll the past two seasons, finishing 15th (3.503 GPA) in 2015-16 and a program-best sixth (3.564 GPA) in 2014-15.

The Billikens’ success on the court translated into unprecedented interest in the program. Saint Louis drew a school-record 9,985 fans to its “Billikens Pink Out” game, attracted 2,000 or more spectators on three other dates, and led the A-10 in average attendance for conference games. This came on the heels of a 2014-15 season that saw SLU experience the 10th-largest attendance increase in NCAA Division I women’s basketball.

Stone’s team showed signs of what was to come during the 2014-15 season. Saint Louis won 15 games – at the time, the most for the Billikens in 12 seasons – and defeated No. 20 George Washington for the program’s first victory over a ranked opponent since 2002-03. The win over the Colonials, who came into the game with a 10-0 league record, was SLU’s second of the season when facing an undefeated A-10 leader. Earlier, the Billikens handed a 6-0 Fordham team its first conference loss of the year.

Under Stone’s guidance, Saint Louis produced its first All-Conference player (Stipanovich, third team) since 2009-10, its first-ever A-10 All-Defensive honoree (Price) and an A-10 All-Rookie selection (Kemph) for a second consecutive season.

A more productive offense was a key component of the 2014-15 Billikens’ success. SLU increased its scoring average from 62.1 in 2013-14 to 65.7; set school records for 3-point field goals and assists; led the A-10 in assists and assist-turnover ratio and finished 13th and 42nd, respectively, in the nation in those categories; and placed 39th nationally in free throw percentage.

The 2013-14 Billikens rebounded to win seven of their last 12 games following a tough start. Saint Louis posted a solid 9-5 record at Chaifetz Arena, its best home mark in 11 years, and won three consecutive conference road games for the first time in program history. The Bills increased their scoring average by 8.1 points over the 2012-13 season.

Saint Louis’ 12-19 record in Stone’s first campaign belied the team's competitiveness as nine of the Billikens’ losses, including four in A-10 play, were by seven or fewer points. Defense was the team’s calling card, with SLU allowing an average of fewer than 60 points per game (57.9) for the first time since the 1985-86 season. The Billikens held 11 opponents to fewer than 50 points, a school record; six of those 11 opponents were A-10 foes.

Saint Louis qualified for the A-10 Championship as the No. 11 seed and upset No. 6 Butler in the first round. In addition, the Billikens won six road games, twice as many as the previous two seasons combined. It was the first time since the 1985-86 season that SLU recorded six road victories.

Prior to her arrival at Saint Louis, Stone served eight seasons (2003-11) in charge at Wisconsin. She began her head-coaching career with a three-year stint at Cornell (Iowa) College, spent 12 seasons at Wisconsin-Eau Claire and had a three-year tenure at Drake.

"We are thrilled to have Lisa and her family join the Saint Louis University community," Director of Athletics Chris May said upon Stone's hiring. "Her successful career, which includes a commitment to academic success and winning at every level, speaks for itself.

"It is an exciting time for the Billikens as we welcome Lisa to SLU to lead the women's basketball program in educating student-athletes, competing for championships and building community," May said. "Lisa's arrival, combined with SLU's educational excellence, state-of-the-art facilities in Chaifetz Arena, the competitive Atlantic 10 Conference and a fertile recruiting base, makes SLU women's basketball poised for success."

"I am excited to be a part of the Billiken family," Stone said. "Saint Louis University has an outstanding commitment to excellence, and I am thrilled to be part of an institution that strongly encourages its student-athletes to lead, learn and serve. The University offers academic prestige, outstanding facilities and a beautiful campus, plus an opportunity to compete in the very strong Atlantic 10 Conference."

Stone guided Wisconsin to five postseason appearances, two 20-win campaigns and a 128-119 record that included a 95-68 mark in her final five seasons. In her fourth season (2006-07), the Badgers won a school-record 23 games (23-13) and finished second in the WNIT.

Following WNIT appearances the next two seasons, Wisconsin's 2009-10 squad posted a 21-11 record, tied for third in the Big Ten Conference and earned an NCAA Tournament bid. Stone was rewarded by being named Big Ten Coach of the Year. The Badgers again tied for third in the Big Ten in 2010-11 and participated in the WNIT.

Wisconsin also excelled academically with Stone at the helm. Twenty-one players combined to earn 42 Academic All-Big Ten nods during her tenure.

Stone's 64-27 record at Drake included a 42-12 Missouri Valley Conference ledger. She led the Bulldogs to a 23-7 record, an MVC regular-season co-championship and an NCAA Tournament berth in her first season (2000-01). Stone, whose 23 victories were the most by a first-year MVC women's basketball coach, was tabbed the league's Coach of the Year. The following season, Stone's team went 25-8, achieved a No. 20 national ranking and reached the NCAA Tournament Sweet 16.

The Drake program also flourished in the classroom under Stone's leadership. The 2000-01 Bulldogs were ranked sixth on the WBCA Academic Top 25 Honor Roll, and the 2001-02 team garnered a No. 15 ranking on the prestigious list.

At NCAA Division III Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Stone turned around a program that had registered just one winning record prior to her arrival. Her teams tallied a 277-59 mark (159-33 in conference play), turned in 11 20-win seasons, reached the NCAA Tournament 11 times and captured six league crowns.

Stone's 1996-97 squad was the national runner-up, and her 1993-94 team finished third in the nation. She was chosen the 1997 WBCA Division III National Coach of the Year, and in 2000 she was named D3 News/Molten Division III National Coach of the Year as the Blugolds posted a 28-1 record. A five-time Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Coach of the Year, Stone was inducted into the UW-Eau Claire Blugold Hall of Fame in 2006.

Stone's accomplishments at UW-Eau Claire led to her selection to the inaugural class of the WIAC Hall of Fame. Additionally, she was named the WIAC Women's Basketball All-Time Co-Coach.

When Stone was named head coach at Division III Cornell College at age 22 in 1985, she was the nation's youngest head basketball coach at a four-year institution. She collected a 34-32 record at Cornell and led the Rams to the Midwest Conference's Southern Division title in each of her three years. Stone also served as the Rams' head softball coach.

In addition to her collegiate coaching experience, Stone was a head coach in the 2001 WBCA All-Star Game as well as an assistant coach for gold-medal-winning Team USA at the 2002 World Championships for Young Women Qualifying Tournament in Brazil.

Stone holds a bachelor's degree in physical education (1984) and a master's degree in athletic administration (1986), both from the University of Iowa. A four-year standout at point guard under legendary head coach C. Vivian Stringer, she is 29th in points (1,129), tied for 10th in steals (177) and 13th in assists (322) on the Iowa career charts. Stone also owns a share of the Hawkeyes' record for steals in a game (nine).

Stone was a three-time team captain and a two-time Hawkeye Most Valuable Player. As a senior, she won the Big Ten Medal of Honor as one of the top scholar-athletes in the conference and also captured the Iowa Student-Athlete of the Year award.

A native of Oregon, Wis., Stone earned four letters each in basketball, tennis and track and field during her high school career. She helped lead Oregon to the Wisconsin Class A state basketball tournament in 1979 and 1980, and she earned first-team All-State honors as a senior and second-team recognition as a junior.

Stone and her husband, Ed, a certified public accountant, are the parents of a daughter, Allison, and a son, Tyler. Allie is a 2015 graduate of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, where she was an All-Conference soccer player. Tyler is a senior at SLU and serves the Billikens as a team manager.

WHAT THEY ARE SAYING ABOUT LISA STONE

"I've known Lisa Stone for quite some time, as a player at Iowa and for many years as a coach. She has always been a strong leader, as well as someone who constantly seeks knowledge and who is always open to new ideas. Her tremendous enthusiasm and her ability to coach and motivate will be a perfect fit for Saint Louis women's basketball. I'm looking forward to following the success of the program in the years to come." - C. Vivian Stringer, head women's basketball coach, Rutgers University

"Lisa is one of the best people I have ever met in the business. She is a high-energy individual who really teaches the game very well. This is a home-run hire for SLU women's basketball and the entire University community." - Bill Fennelly, head women's basketball coach, Iowa State University

"Lisa Stone is a tremendous teacher of the game of basketball. Her ability to instantly transform a program with a defensive commitment is one of the best in the business. Her teams are mentally tough and compete night in and night out. Lisa's enthusiasm and passion for the game transcends to the recruiting trails. Her Midwest ties and contacts will be an asset to Saint Louis University. They could not have made a better choice in hiring Lisa Stone." - Suzy Merchant, head women's basketball coach, Michigan State University

"The hiring of Lisa Stone is a fantastic addition to the Saint Louis University women's basketball program and the entire athletic department. She is an energetic, passionate, caring human being with a great personality, and she transfers those characteristics into being a great basketball coach and mentor. She is a strong recruiter who knows how to build relationships, and she puts it all together on the basketball floor." - Sharon Versyp, head women's basketball coach, Purdue University

"In hiring Lisa Stone, Saint Louis is adding a hard worker who really knows the game of basketball. Lisa is a very good teacher of the game, but she is always looking to learn more. She has the ability to highly motivate her players, and she really cares about their development on and off the court. Overall, she has built her record because she is dedicated to the game and to helping her student-athletes." - Bo Ryan, head men's basketball coach, University of Wisconsin

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